do you remember when we gave Dave the power?

Apparently ‘we’ did.

 

Way back in 2010 a minority of the voters in Great Britain chose the Conservative party when marking their voting papers. Politics meant that the leader of that party became Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and my blood pressure has been raised since.

The regular reader will know that I have ranted and raved about various aspects of Dave’s government, but when it comes to the impact of their ‘reforms’ on the sick and disabled- the likes of me and plenty of people you know- no one is better than Sue Marsh and her blog Diary of a Benefit Scrounger.

 

Since the coalition came to power, sick and disabled people have claimed we are being fundamentally harmed by the coalition welfare reforms. Not scroungers or skivers, but  people living with long term serious illnesses like me, or who live with physical disabilities. Adults AND children. Young and old. People with terminal conditions, people with kidney or heart failure, people waiting for transplants and even people in comas. None have been spared. The government repeatedly assure you they have. …
[On Thursday, 31July], at the request of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, (EHRC) NIESR, the National Institute for Economic and Social Research have produced a definitive Cumulative Impact Assessment and it is shocking equalityhumanrights.com/commission-welcomes-report-financial-policy-making-and-modelling-cumulative-equality-impacts …
"Figure 4.9 shows that households with disabled children lose out by more in cash terms than households with disabled adults, with households with disabled children and adults losing out by more than either group – around £1,500 per household per year on average. ...
 "Households with no disabled adults or disabled children in the 7th and 8th deciles [wealthier households] actually gain slightly from the reform package, whereas households with disabled adults or children (or both) lose out."

As one of the authors, Jonathan Portes says in an article for the Guardian  

"....Families that have a disabled adult or child lose perhaps five times as much proportionally as better-off able-bodied families."

There is now absolutely no doubt at all that sick and disabled people have been hit over and over again by a barrage of cuts and the more vulnerable the family; the more disabled people within it; the more they have lost. 

Dave and his mates are choosing to do this. To promote division and inequality. To wear people down so they don’t have the energy or the resources to protest. They have known what they were doing and they have lied about it repeatedly.
Remember that when election time comes around.
Remember that we don’t choose to be sick or disabled.
Remember that the families with disabled children are losing the most.
Remember who you are.
Remember your values.
Use your vote.
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11 thoughts on “do you remember when we gave Dave the power?”

  1. I have a clear conscience. We in Northern Ireland only cast votes for the bit players well back in the commons benches. We have no opportunity to cast a vote for the main parties (not that they have much to offer us.)

    1. We are fortunate that our Assembly has so far refused to implement many of these ‘reforms’, but we need to be sure our Westminster back benchers use whatever influence they have. With a minority government, that could be disproportionate.

  2. Unfortunately even if the Conservatives get a minority of the vote and no direct mandate, they can once again form a coalition with some suitably submissive party and then just do exactly what they want. Democracy is withering away rapidly.

    1. It’s scary stuff Nick. And the apparent lack of outrage or credible alternative seems to be just a feature of political life- we are all too disengaged and sleepwalking into even greater inequality.

  3. I don’t understand, and never will, the lack of compassionate planning to care for those who need assistance, and the ill and disabled should be at the top of the compassionate care list. I always hope for better, but I admit I’m also often disappointed. ox

    1. I think the wealthy are so removed from the everyday of the rest of us that they simply can’t understand the impact. £1,500 means nothing to them. When they fall ill, they can afford to buy the best care without having to grapple with multiple systems. The government is comprised of privately educated millionaires- they think that’s normal- it’s the rest of us who are doing something wrong and they have no need to help.

  4. Some of the attitudes I see today remind me of those who believed the workhouse was the answer- make life harsh and that’ll push those lazy good for nothing people who have disabilities out to work. Or for some inexplicable reason they think looking after a disabled child can, and therefore will, be done on a shoestring. Those who have mental health conditions are really suffering due to incorrect assessment of needs. To be honest it was difficult enough getting benefits that you were entitled to when on dialysis in the 1980’s. That will have become worse. However the biggest drawback for me in getting help when ‘downed’ with neurological and rheumatological problems back in 2004, and in quite a few of the years following that, was due to secondary care doctors’ lack of understanding of rare and complex conditions. No diagnoses, no fitting of boxes; restricted help. People in the same boat today could face even greater difficulties. This is in addition to inadequate management of undiagnosed conditions. There are so many vicious circles, for different reasons, in which you can become entrapped and this is true regardless of whether disability is caused by a rare or common condition; or it affects an adult or child. When it rains it can certainly pour. I have been watching The Mill and although it is only a drama it reminds me that we so often take for granted all those who suffered hardship but kept fighting for a better life for the sick and poor. The problem with stopping the reforms from being implemented here is the certainty of financial cutbacks. So the answer must lie along the lines of stopping the current reforms throughout the UK and finding a better way of helping the disabled. There is a great deal of discontent and what I do not understand is why the Government has not been brought down because of it. Is there not enough support from the media where it counts?

    1. Agreed – even scarier is the thought processes that go into these changes – stripped of all essence of humanity and seeing us as units of exchange/production/waste or whatever – an we roll over and let them stick it all up our back passage!

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